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Resources from the NCCs for Public Health

The six National Collaborating Centres for Public Health translate existing knowledge to produce and exchange relevant, accessible, and evidence-informed products with researchers, practitioners, and policymakers. 

Each NCC has its own website that links to resources and upcoming knowledge exchange opportunities. These may include presentations, evidence reviews, reports, inventories of resources, annotated bibliographies,fact sheets, summaries, electronic resources, workshops, courses, etc. To learn more, visit the links below: 

NCC for Aboriginal Health 

NCC for Determinants of Health: 

NCC for Environmental Health:

Posted on : 7/20/2012. Categorized as : social determinants of health
The NCCDH produced a series of case studies that profile action on the social determinants of health in various setting. The cases are designed to help public health practitioners in a range of settings advance health equity within the scope of their practice. “Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan”, empowers communities to address poverty. Over 2500 New Brunswick residents contributed to the development of the plan, and were invited to join one of 12 Community Inclusion Networks across the province.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : traffic calming, active transportation
This document prepared by the NCCHPP briefly presents the effects of traffic-calming interventions on active transportation. This summary is the fourth in a series of five short documents based on Urban Traffic Calming and Health: A Literature Review. It briefly presents the effects of traffic calming on active transportation. The four other documents focus on road safety, air quality, environmental noise, and inequalities.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : pH1N1
This review addresses the approaches to pH1N1 laboratory testing across Canada and a subset of countries with similar health care systems, and strengths and weaknesses of these approaches.
Posted on : 7/20/2012. Categorized as : social determinants of health

This expedited systematic review is part of the NCCDH's effort to explores “what works” to improve health equity through action on the social determinants of health. The purpose of the review is to examine the question, “What is the impact and effectiveness of intersectoral action as a public health practice for health equity through action on the social determinants of health?”

 

Posted on : 7/23/2012. Categorized as : health inequities
The Canadian Institutes of Health Research-Institute of Population and Public Health (CIHR-IPPH), the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH), and its partners hosted The Research-Practitioner Health Equity Workshop: Bridging the Gap that took place in Toronto on February 14-15, 2012. The purpose of the workshop was to strengthen relationships between researchers and practitioners to address health inequities. Descriptions of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop are included in this document.
Posted on : 7/20/2012. Categorized as : social determinants of health
The NCCDH produced a series of case studies that profile action on the social determinants of health in various setting. The cases are designed to help public health practitioners in a range of settings advance health equity within the scope of their practice. Public health leaders took advantage of relevant, local and comparative health data – and a possible media interest – to focus regional managers' attention on the health of people from Winnipeg's poorest neighbourhoods. They were turning up in city hospitals at two or three – sometimes even five – times the rate of the city's wealthiest residents. The data provided a catalyst for action that now involves managers from all areas of the health region and is strengthening ties with anti-poverty and other community organizations. Their approach casts a health equity lens over all aspects of the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, including health services delivery and long-term care.
Posted on : 6/6/2012. Categorized as : social determinants of health
They are the subset of the determinants of health. The term ‘social determinants of health' describes the many social conditions that interact to influence risks to our health and well-being and affect how vulnerable we are to disease and injury. The NCC for Determinants of Health has developed this updated fact sheet for the six NCCPH, please click here to access this document.
Posted on : 7/20/2012. Categorized as : social determinants of health
The NCCDH produced a series of case studies that profile action on the social determinants of health in various setting. The cases are designed to help public health practitioners in a range of settings advance health equity within the scope of their practice. Detailed health information at the neighbourhood level in Saskatoon showed that data averaging was hiding serious health differences among city residents. People in the lowest income areas were many times more likely than their wealthier neighbours to be hospitalized, give birth while in their teens, or have an infant die in its first year of life. Dr. Cory Neudorf, Saskatoon's Chief Medical Health Officer, used the data as a rallying point to engage citizens, community organizations, municipal departments and other levels of government to work together to address health inequities.
Posted on : 7/20/2012. Categorized as : social determinants of health
The NCCDH produced a series of case studies that profile action on the social determinants of health in various setting. The cases are designed to help public health practitioners in a range of settings advance health equity within the scope of their practice. Extensive changes to the health structure in Québec meant that public health risked being lost in the shuffle. Legislation in November 2005 merged public health services, traditionally provided through community service locations, into regional centres that included long-term care facilities and hospitals. Seizing the opportunity, Dr. Jocelyne Sauvé, Public Health Director for the region of La Montérégie, developed a detailed training program to embed a population health approach in the new managers, many of whom had little or no experience in public health. Her program was a resounding success, and is now being implemented province-wide, instilling a population-health perspective into all health service delivery.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : traffic calming, air quality
This document prepared by the NCCHPP briefly presents the effects of traffic-calming interventions on air quality. This is the second in a series of five short documents based on Urban Traffic Calming and Health: A Literature Review. It briefly presents the effects of traffic calming on air pollution produced by traffic. The four other documents will focus on road safety, environmental noise, active transportation and inequalities.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : traffic calming, environmental noise

Prepared by the NCCHPP, this document briefly presents the effects of traffic-calming interventions on traffic noise. This summary is the third in a series of five short documents based on Urban Traffic Calming and Health: A Literature Review. It briefly presents the effects of traffic calming on traffic noise. The four other documents will focus on road safety, air quality, active transportation and inequalities.

 

Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : health impact assessment
Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a practice that aims to evaluate the potential impacts of a policy, program or project on population health so as to minimize the negative and maximize the positive effects.
This document prepared by the NCCHPP examines the main arguments in favour of citizen participation as well as some of the obstacles and risks associated with citizen participation in HIA.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : health impact assessment
To facilitate the work of those searching for HIA guides or tools adapted to their needs, we have listed and classified the HIA guides and tools available on the internet. This document was originally published in June 2008, and was updated in 2011-2012.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : developmental health
This briefing note, prepared by the Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit (SPHERU), defines developmental health, discusses its social determinants, shows some key figures for Canada and proposes a healthy family policy framework to support health for all Canadians.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : Geographic Information Systems
The key benefit of deploying GIS in public health practice is that it can summarize a large amount of tabular data into visual maps that can be very insightful for the planning and evaluation of public programs, and for engaging the attention of policy makers and the public in the process (2, 8-11). By adding the “place” to the traditional person/time/place triad underlying public health epidemiology and surveillance, the use of GIS technology can help public health practitioners better appreciate how and where place matters in affecting the public's health in ways that are policy and programmatically relevant. This edition of the Purple Paper was written by Dr. Chris Green, Assistant Professor with the Department of Community Health Sciences at the University of Manitoba and Epidemiologist with the Manitoba Chief Veterinary Office.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : health impact assessment
Published by the NCCHPP, the main focus of this inventory of HIA resources is the practice of HIA as related to the development of healthy public policy. This document was originally published in May 2009, and was updated in November 2011.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : syphilis
Syphilis remains a global problem with an estimated 12 million people infected annually (Gerbase, 1998). About 90% of these infections are in low-income countries (Peeling, 2004; Peeling, 2006). The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 2 million pregnant women each year are infected with syphilis globally and that approximately 1.2 million of these pregnant women with syphilis transmit the infection to their newborn resulting in still-birth and babies born with congenital syphilis (Salojee, 2004). In the developing world, many of these babies will die in the first year of life.
Posted on : 4/19/2012. Categorized as : zoonoses
In addition to dogs and cats, the popularity of exotic animals, such as geckos, bearded dragons, and African Dwarf Frogs is increasing; the greatest increase is ownership among children. It is estimated that approximately 75% of emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic. The implications of these two trends are of concern to the public health community. Prepared by the NCCEH, a review was conducted of household pet zoonoses.
Posted on : 2/28/2012. Categorized as : Traffic calming
Published by the NCCHPP, this summary is the first in a series of five short documents based on Urban Traffic Calming and Health: A Literature Review.  It briefly presents the effects of traffic calming on the number and severity of collisions.
Posted on : 4/19/2012. Categorized as : environmental health, one health
One Health emphasizes multi-sector, transdisciplinary action across professions to ensure well-being within human, animal, and ecosystem interfaces. This paper will provide an overview of One Health, the evolution of the movement, and the current challenges. Also, this paper will showcase the application of One Health through the Canadian response to West Nile virus.
Posted on : 3/28/2012. Categorized as : disinfection, antimicrobial
This document is intended for public health inspectors and reviews the effectiveness, disinfection potential, and pertinent issues of major types of alternative agents that claim to have antimicrobial properties. Alternative agents that are reviewed include: tea tree oil, thyme oil, electrolyzed water, ozonated water, silver-based products, vinegar (acetic acid), lemon juice (citric acid), baking soda (sodium bicarbonate), and microfibre cloths.
Posted on : 2/2/2012. Categorized as : public policy
Produced by the NCCHPP, this document examines the way in which five not-for-profit (NFP) organizations use health knowledge in their efforts to influence public policy related to population health. This document is part of a project exploring issues surrounding relationships between not-for-profit organizations (NFPs) and the public health sector. More specifically, it deals with the way in which NFPs use health knowledge in their practices and the issues that this raises for public health professionals conducting or planning to engage in knowledge exchange processes with these stakeholders.