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NCCPH Publications

The National Collaborating Centres translate existing knowledge to produce and exchange relevant, accessible, and evidence-informed products with researchers, practitioners, and policy makers. These products can take many different forms and formats: presentations, evidence reviews, reports, inventories of resources, annotated bibliographies, fact sheets, summaries, electronic resources, workshops, courses, etc. Discover them by clicking on the following links, or select a specific theme or product using the “keywords” or “Centre” searches.

This background paper presents a review and analysis of the literature at the intersection of the fields of health economics and public health.
This detailed review set out to answer the question about whether cardiovascular effects from traffic pollution were related more to noise or air pollution. Despite correlations observed between noise and air-pollution, there was very little confounding; these traffic-related pollutants had independent effects on cardiovascular outcomes. 

Image: © iStockphoto.com/ egdigital
NCCMT is committed to sharing stories that illustrate how organizations across Canada are implementing evidence-informed public health (EIPH). This is the first in a planned series that talks about the state of EIPH in Canada.

Peel Public Health is now well-known as an organization that supports evidence-informed practice, but how did they get started? Dr. Megan Ward, Assistant Medical Officer of Health for the Region of Peel, explains how that journey began with a consultation from NCCMT. Dr. Ward and other key staff members talk about the challenges and triumphs that have resulted from Peel's commitment to the systematic use of research evidence. This video shares tips on how to get started with EIPH no matter the size of your organization.

To learn more, click here.

The four public health roles is a framework that can help organizations make health equity a strategic focus of their governance, policies, and partnerships.

To learn more, click here.
 
This report provides a broad overview of socio-economic determinants of Indigenous health, including income, education, unemployment or working conditions, housing, community and social support, health care access, early childhood influences and education, healthy living, substance use (including alcohol, tobacco, and drugs), nutrition, and social exclusion. It also presents information on current interventions and their effectiveness.

See the related web story.
Wicked problems are particularly complex, persistent and hard-to-resolve. They are commonly encountered in public policy work, and notably within the public health sector. Wicked problems defy the usual linear approaches and are not amenable to straightforward solutions. One of the reasons they are particularly difficult to resolve is because they are usually intertwined with other complex issues. Health inequalities, for example, may be tied to a multitude of issues such as poverty, education, race/ethnicity or gender.

This fact sheet by the NCC for Healthy Public Policy defines the essential features of wicked problems, differentiates them from other kinds of problem, and discusses how they might be addressed.

This fact sheet provides a general introduction to Aboriginal health in Canada and to the broad context in which Aboriginal communities, health practitioners, policymakers and researchers seek to improve the health and well-being of Aboriginal peoples. Specifically, it provides an overview of Aboriginal peoples, the social determinants that impact their health, current health status indicators, and the jurisdictional framework for Aboriginal health policies and programs.
On January 15–16, 2013, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Institute of Population and Public Health (IPPH), the National Collaborating Centres for Public Health (NCCPH), the Canadian Population Health Initiative of the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CPHI-CIHI) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), partnered to co-host Advancing Population and Public Health Economics in Toronto, Ontario. This workshop was organized to ask experts in economics how the funding, generation, dissemination and use of economic evidence might be enhanced to better develop population and public health policies and programs in Canada.

Click here to download the report  PDF 288 K

(Source of the text on this page: Advancing Population and Public Health Economics: Workshop Proceedings, pp. 2 and 5)
Online tools to support and structure your search for research evidence!

Searching online for research evidence is an acquired skill. The 6S Pyramid (hierarchy of synthesized evidence) saves you time and ensures you will find the most synthesized evidence available to answer your public health questions.

NCCMT developed these pre-populated Search Pyramids based on the 6S Pyramid with the help of an experienced librarian with expertise in evidence-informed practice. Our topic-specific Search Pyramids focus on issues defined by public health professionals as high priorities in Canada. Find out more.

Posted on : 2013-04-15. Categorized as : environmental health
This evidence review describes the elements required to assess safety of genetically modified animals and addresses the following questions: (1) What types of human health risks are associated with consumption of genetically modified foods, in general? (2) What are the general attitudes among Canadian consumers toward genetically modified animals intended for human consumption? (3) What are some of the health concerns associated with consumption of transgenic animals that are currently undergoing food safety review?

 
Posted on : 2013-04-10. Categorized as : public health ethics
This book brings together 16 cases of ethical issues encountered across a range of public health issues and sectors and presents accompanying analyses by leading experts in public health ethics. The book's foreword was written by former Joint Centre for Bioethics (JCB) Director, Dr. Ross Upshur.

The casebook was supported by financial and in-kind contributions by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy, and Public Health Ontario. The views herein do not necessarily reflect those of the contributing organizations and these organizations cannot assume responsibility for the accuracy of content.

To download (3.16 MB, on the site of the Joint Centre for Bioethics at the University of Toronto).

Posted on : 7/23/2012. Categorized as : health inequities
The Canadian Institutes of Health Research-Institute of Population and Public Health (CIHR-IPPH), the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH), and its partners hosted The Research-Practitioner Health Equity Workshop: Bridging the Gap that took place in Toronto on February 14-15, 2012. The purpose of the workshop was to strengthen relationships between researchers and practitioners to address health inequities. Descriptions of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop are included in this document.
Posted on : 7/20/2012. Categorized as : social determinants of health
The NCCDH produced a series of case studies that profile action on the social determinants of health in various setting. The cases are designed to help public health practitioners in a range of settings advance health equity within the scope of their practice. “Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan”, empowers communities to address poverty. Over 2500 New Brunswick residents contributed to the development of the plan, and were invited to join one of 12 Community Inclusion Networks across the province.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : traffic calming, active transportation
This document prepared by the NCCHPP briefly presents the effects of traffic-calming interventions on active transportation. This summary is the fourth in a series of five short documents based on Urban Traffic Calming and Health: A Literature Review. It briefly presents the effects of traffic calming on active transportation. The four other documents focus on road safety, air quality, environmental noise, and inequalities.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : pH1N1
This review addresses the approaches to pH1N1 laboratory testing across Canada and a subset of countries with similar health care systems, and strengths and weaknesses of these approaches.
Posted on : 7/20/2012. Categorized as : social determinants of health

This expedited systematic review is part of the NCCDH's effort to explores “what works” to improve health equity through action on the social determinants of health. The purpose of the review is to examine the question, “What is the impact and effectiveness of intersectoral action as a public health practice for health equity through action on the social determinants of health?”

 

Posted on : 7/20/2012. Categorized as : social determinants of health
The NCCDH produced a series of case studies that profile action on the social determinants of health in various setting. The cases are designed to help public health practitioners in a range of settings advance health equity within the scope of their practice. Public health leaders took advantage of relevant, local and comparative health data – and a possible media interest – to focus regional managers' attention on the health of people from Winnipeg's poorest neighbourhoods. They were turning up in city hospitals at two or three – sometimes even five – times the rate of the city's wealthiest residents. The data provided a catalyst for action that now involves managers from all areas of the health region and is strengthening ties with anti-poverty and other community organizations. Their approach casts a health equity lens over all aspects of the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, including health services delivery and long-term care.
Posted on : 6/6/2012. Categorized as : social determinants of health
They are the subset of the determinants of health. The term ‘social determinants of health' describes the many social conditions that interact to influence risks to our health and well-being and affect how vulnerable we are to disease and injury. The NCC for Determinants of Health has developed this updated fact sheet for the six NCCPH, please click here to access this document.
Posted on : 7/20/2012. Categorized as : social determinants of health
The NCCDH produced a series of case studies that profile action on the social determinants of health in various setting. The cases are designed to help public health practitioners in a range of settings advance health equity within the scope of their practice. Detailed health information at the neighbourhood level in Saskatoon showed that data averaging was hiding serious health differences among city residents. People in the lowest income areas were many times more likely than their wealthier neighbours to be hospitalized, give birth while in their teens, or have an infant die in its first year of life. Dr. Cory Neudorf, Saskatoon's Chief Medical Health Officer, used the data as a rallying point to engage citizens, community organizations, municipal departments and other levels of government to work together to address health inequities.
Posted on : 7/20/2012. Categorized as : social determinants of health
The NCCDH produced a series of case studies that profile action on the social determinants of health in various setting. The cases are designed to help public health practitioners in a range of settings advance health equity within the scope of their practice. Extensive changes to the health structure in Québec meant that public health risked being lost in the shuffle. Legislation in November 2005 merged public health services, traditionally provided through community service locations, into regional centres that included long-term care facilities and hospitals. Seizing the opportunity, Dr. Jocelyne Sauvé, Public Health Director for the region of La Montérégie, developed a detailed training program to embed a population health approach in the new managers, many of whom had little or no experience in public health. Her program was a resounding success, and is now being implemented province-wide, instilling a population-health perspective into all health service delivery.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : traffic calming, air quality
This document prepared by the NCCHPP briefly presents the effects of traffic-calming interventions on air quality. This is the second in a series of five short documents based on Urban Traffic Calming and Health: A Literature Review. It briefly presents the effects of traffic calming on air pollution produced by traffic. The four other documents will focus on road safety, environmental noise, active transportation and inequalities.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : traffic calming, environmental noise

Prepared by the NCCHPP, this document briefly presents the effects of traffic-calming interventions on traffic noise. This summary is the third in a series of five short documents based on Urban Traffic Calming and Health: A Literature Review. It briefly presents the effects of traffic calming on traffic noise. The four other documents will focus on road safety, air quality, active transportation and inequalities.

 

Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : health impact assessment
Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a practice that aims to evaluate the potential impacts of a policy, program or project on population health so as to minimize the negative and maximize the positive effects.
This document prepared by the NCCHPP examines the main arguments in favour of citizen participation as well as some of the obstacles and risks associated with citizen participation in HIA.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : health impact assessment
To facilitate the work of those searching for HIA guides or tools adapted to their needs, we have listed and classified the HIA guides and tools available on the internet. This document was originally published in June 2008, and was updated in 2011-2012.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : developmental health
This briefing note, prepared by the Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit (SPHERU), defines developmental health, discusses its social determinants, shows some key figures for Canada and proposes a healthy family policy framework to support health for all Canadians.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : Geographic Information Systems
The key benefit of deploying GIS in public health practice is that it can summarize a large amount of tabular data into visual maps that can be very insightful for the planning and evaluation of public programs, and for engaging the attention of policy makers and the public in the process (2, 8-11). By adding the “place” to the traditional person/time/place triad underlying public health epidemiology and surveillance, the use of GIS technology can help public health practitioners better appreciate how and where place matters in affecting the public's health in ways that are policy and programmatically relevant. This edition of the Purple Paper was written by Dr. Chris Green, Assistant Professor with the Department of Community Health Sciences at the University of Manitoba and Epidemiologist with the Manitoba Chief Veterinary Office.
Posted on : 7/5/2012. Categorized as : health impact assessment
Published by the NCCHPP, the main focus of this inventory of HIA resources is the practice of HIA as related to the development of healthy public policy. This document was originally published in May 2009, and was updated in November 2011.
Posted on : 4/19/2012. Categorized as : zoonoses
In addition to dogs and cats, the popularity of exotic animals, such as geckos, bearded dragons, and African Dwarf Frogs is increasing; the greatest increase is ownership among children. It is estimated that approximately 75% of emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic. The implications of these two trends are of concern to the public health community. Prepared by the NCCEH, a review was conducted of household pet zoonoses.
Posted on : 2/28/2012. Categorized as : Traffic calming
Published by the NCCHPP, this summary is the first in a series of five short documents based on Urban Traffic Calming and Health: A Literature Review.  It briefly presents the effects of traffic calming on the number and severity of collisions.
Posted on : 4/19/2012. Categorized as : environmental health, one health
One Health emphasizes multi-sector, transdisciplinary action across professions to ensure well-being within human, animal, and ecosystem interfaces. This paper will provide an overview of One Health, the evolution of the movement, and the current challenges. Also, this paper will showcase the application of One Health through the Canadian response to West Nile virus.
Posted on : 3/28/2012. Categorized as : disinfection, antimicrobial
This document is intended for public health inspectors and reviews the effectiveness, disinfection potential, and pertinent issues of major types of alternative agents that claim to have antimicrobial properties. Alternative agents that are reviewed include: tea tree oil, thyme oil, electrolyzed water, ozonated water, silver-based products, vinegar (acetic acid), lemon juice (citric acid), baking soda (sodium bicarbonate), and microfibre cloths.
Posted on : 2/2/2012. Categorized as : public policy
Produced by the NCCHPP, this document examines the way in which five not-for-profit (NFP) organizations use health knowledge in their efforts to influence public policy related to population health. This document is part of a project exploring issues surrounding relationships between not-for-profit organizations (NFPs) and the public health sector. More specifically, it deals with the way in which NFPs use health knowledge in their practices and the issues that this raises for public health professionals conducting or planning to engage in knowledge exchange processes with these stakeholders.
The NCC for Methods and Tools has undertaken this environmental scan to inform its strategic planning activities for the next five years (2010–2015). This environmental scan will highlight and summarize new and emerging developments, pressures and potential opportunities in the broad health care landscape.
Evidence-informed public health involves integrating the best available research evidence into the decision-making process. The NCC for Methods and Tools has developed a fact sheet providing various sources of evidence and examples to consider in the evidence-informed public health decision-making process.